The UCC’s Response to White Media Attacks on Dr. Wright

Here is a savvy statement by Rev. John H. Thomas, the United Church of Christ general minister and president, on the distorted, elliptical, inflammatory, and overtly racist news coverage of Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr., (pictured here, photo credit) and Chicago’s Trinity United Church of Christ. Rev. WrightIt is titled “ What Kind of Prophet? Reflections on the Rhetoric of Preaching in Light of Recent News Coverage of Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr. and Trinity United Church of Christ.”

Rev. Thomas, who is white, is quite specific about the white-washed media attacks:

Over the weekend members of our church and others have been subjected to the relentless airing of two or three brief video clips of sermons by the Rev. Dr. Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr., pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ for thirty-six years and, for over half of those years, pastor of Senator Barack Obama and his family. These video clips, and news stories about them, have been served up with frenzied and heated commentary by media personalities expressing shock that such language and sentiments could be uttered from the pulpit.

He then accents media illiteracy on US religion, and on Black America:

One is tempted to ask whether these commentators ever listen to the overcharged rhetoric of their own opinion shows. Even more to the point is to wonder whether they have a working knowledge of the history of preaching in the United States from the unrelentingly grim language of New England election day sermons to the fiery rhetoric of the Black church prophetic tradition. Maybe they prefer the false prophets with their happy homilies in Jeremiah who say to the people: “You shall not see the sword, nor shall you have famine, but I will give you true peace in this place.” To which God responds, “The prophets are prophesying lies in my name; I did not send them, nor did I command them or speak to them. They are prophesying to you a lying vision, worthless divination, and the deceit of their own minds. . . . By sword and famine those prophets shall be consumed,” (Jeremiah 14.14-15). The Biblical Jeremiah was coarse and provocative. Faithfulness, not respectability was the order of the day then. And now?

What’s really going on here? First, it may state the obvious to point out that these television and radio shows have very little interest in Trinity Church or Jeremiah Wright. Those who sifted through hours of sermons searching for a few lurid phrases and those who have aired them repeatedly have only one intention. It is to wound a presidential candidate. In the process a congregation that does exceptional ministry and a pastor who has given his life to shape those ministries is caricatured and demonized.

Indeed, only a few minutes out of hundreds of thousands of minutes were sorted out and repeated hundreds of times, out of context, by ABC News and others just to smear Dr. Wright, a leading Protestant minister in the United States. Thomas continues thus:

But what was his real crime? He is condemned for using a mild “obscenity” in reference to the United States. This week we mark the fifth anniversary of the war in Iraq, a war conceived in deception and prosecuted in foolish arrogance. Nearly four thousand cherished Americans have been killed, countless more wounded, and tens of thousands of Iraqis slaughtered. Where is the real obscenity here? True patriotism requires a degree of self-criticism, even self-judgment that may not always be easy or genteel. Pastor Wright’s judgment may be starker and more sweeping than many of us are prepared to accept. But is the soul of our nation served any better by the polite prayers and gentle admonitions that have gone without a real hearing for these five years while the dying and destruction continues?

And then Thomas moves to what is the real problem for a white-controlled mass media:

We might like to think that racism is a thing of the past, that Martin Luther King’s harmonious multi-racial vision, articulated in his speech at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963 and then struck down by an assassin’s bullet in Memphis in 1968, has somehow been resurrected and now reigns throughout the land. Significant progress has been made. A black man is a legitimate candidate for President of the United States. A black woman serves as Secretary of State. The accomplishments are profound. But on the gritty streets of Chicago’s south side where Trinity has planted itself, race continues to play favorites in failing urban school systems, unresponsive health care systems, crumbling infrastructure, and meager economic development. Are we to pretend all is well because much is, in fact, better than it used to be? Is it racist to name the racial divides that continue to afflict our nation, and to do so loudly? How ironic that a pastor and congregation which, for forty-five years, has cast its lot with a predominantly white denomination, participating fully in its wider church life and contributing generously to it, would be accused of racial exclusion and a failure to reach for racial reconciliation.

Thomas then concludes with a key point about honest religion critiquing immoral US politics–and thus about the racially biased media’s immorality and anti-Obama politics:

Is Pastor Wright to be ridiculed and condemned for refusing to play the court prophet, blessing land and sovereign while pledging allegiance to our preoccupation with wealth and our fascination with weapons? In the United Church of Christ we honor diversity. For nearly four centuries we have respected dissent and have struggled to maintain the freedom of the pulpit. . . . And, as we struggle with that ancient calling, I pray we will be shrewd enough to name the hypocrisy of those who decry the mixing of religion and politics in order to serve their own political ends.

Comments

  1. Joe M.

    Thanks for the post of the minister’s comments. I attend a UCC on the north side of Chicago (though not regular enough). People from the church are going to Trinity next Sunday evening in support of Rev Wright and as a show of unity in the denomination. While I take issue on spiritual grounds with some of the things Rev. Wright said, I hope I can make it because he is a great spiritual leader and inspiring public figure (who is still human and capable of mistakes). I think Rev Thomas does well to point out those in the media who, as Jesus said, are “blind guides, which strain at a gnat, and swallow a camel.” (Math 23:24) God help us.

  2. Seattle in Texas

    A side note partially related. There is an email being circulated in the PNW, I haven’t got it from anybody locally or elsewhere, but it’s long and claims Obama is the Anti-Christ and uses Biblical quotes to justify this (probably made by our republican/hate group buddies who are about to get politically smashed again). Even some Clinton supporters up there are disturbed by this—especially since he is the likely candidate. I think scholars on religion (sociology, psychology, philosophy, theology, etc. particularly theology) can be very useful in helping counter this stuff. It’s absolutely ludicrous. And of course help in countering Wright attacks, all of it. I really wish religion and politics were kept separate….

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